Last Minute Recipes for Christmas and Other Special Days.

If you’re anything like me and usually leave planning what you’ll prepare for Xmas Day way too late, then here’s your lifeline. Below I’ve complied some of my recipes that’ll be perfect for any special occasion, or random party.

I’ve included some for the main event at your place, others to take to someone else’s place, and some dishes to make in a flash if you’ve been invited to drinks at the last minute. I hope this list helps.

The below recipes are all out of my books.

Happy holidays,

Janella

Fig-Cacao-Truffles-Janella-Purcell-1050x750

 

[private]Codes

EFTS – Eating For The Seasons

JWK – Janella’s Wholefood Kitchen

JSNF – Janella’s Super Natural Foods

Starters 

Fresh Spring Rolls (EFTS)

2 SMALL PKTS BEAN THREAD VERMICELLI

½ CUP TAMARI

½ TSP SESAME OIL

1 PKT SMALL ROUND RICE PAPER WRAPPERS

2 SHEETS  NORI, CUT INTO THICK MATCHSTICKS

2 CARROTS, JULIENNED

1 LEBANESE CUCUMBER, SKIN ON AND JULIENNED

2 AVOCADOS, SLICED

3 CUPS YUMMY TOFU (see page 154)

8 SPRING  ONIONS, SLICED DIAGONALLY

1 CUP EACH MINT  AND CORIANDER LEAVES

 

Fresh spring rolls [df, gf, vg, v]

Rice wrappers are a blessing when you’re first learning to live without wheat. For a light, fresh and tasty lunch with good friends, serve all the ingredients on a platter and roll as you go. These are the fillings I use most often but you should experiment with your preferred fillings. Nori is a dried sea vegetable available in paper-thin sheets that you can eat as a snack or wrap around rice. It has a high protein and iodine content and is the most easily digested of the seaweeds.

SERVES 4

Place the noodles in a bowl and cover with hot water. They will soften  in a few minutes.

Meanwhile, combine the Tamari and sesame oil and pour into small, individual bowls, one for each person. Place the rest of the ingredients in piles around the edges of a

large serving  platter with the herbs in the middle. Strain the noodles  and place on the serving  platter.

To serve, put the platter in the middle of the table and have a ceramic bowl of boiling water  on the table. Each person places their own rice paper  wrapper in the water  for

about 15 seconds then gently removes it and puts it on their plate. Place a piece of nori in the centre of the rice paper  and then add a couple of pieces of carrot, a piece each

of cucumber and avocado, and top with a piece of Yummy Tofu and a small amount of noodles and spring onions. Finish with a sprinkling of coriander and mint—don’t fill

the wraps too much, as they might burst when rolling or eating. Roll up by folding over

the end closest  to you, tucking  in the outer edges and continuing to roll. They will stick together so is no need to add water  to secure them. Eat with the dipping sauce.

 

Variations

  • Mix one teaspoon rice wine vinegar and/or one teaspoon grated coconut palm sugar with the cucumber.
  • Use sliced garlic prawns or shredded organic chicken instead of or as well as the tofu.

 

Mini Risotto Balls (EFTS)

 

1–2 TBSP OLIVE OIL

1 WHITE  ONION, FINELY DICED

2 CLOVES GARLIC, CRUSHED

½ CUP DRIED PORCINI  MUSHROOMS

1 CUP FRESH  SHIITAKE  MUSHROOMS, FINELY CHOPPED

½ CUP ORGANIC, SHORT- GRAIN BROWN RICE

1½ LITRES  GOOD VEGETABLE STOCK, SIMMERING

1 CUP HERBS LIKE BASIL AND PARSLEY, FINELY CHOPPED

½ TBSP SHIRO MISO OR 1 TSP SEA SALT

 

Mini  risotto balls [df, gf, vg, v]

These make a filling, healthy and delicious party food. Risotto balls are a great way to use up leftover risotto, too. Feel free to use any vegetable you like if mushrooms  aren’t your thing. Try corn and crab; pumpkin; zucchini and mint or organic chicken.

MAKES ABOUT 25 BALLS

Heat the oil in a pan and add the onions  and garlic. Sauté until the onions  are soft and translucent. Meanwhile, soak the porcini mushrooms in enough hot water  to cover

them. When they have softened, drain  and reserve the liquid. Add the porcinis to the pan with the shiitake mushrooms. Now, add the rice to the pan and stir to coat.

Add the porcini soaking liquid to the simmering stock. Pour the stock into the rice

mixture one ladle at a time, stirring continuously. Be sure that  all the liquid has been absorbed before adding the next ladle of liquid. Continue adding the stock until the

rice is al dente.  Remove from the heat and let the rice cool—this will happen faster if

you stick a few metallic utensils in the mixture to let the heat escape. Stir through the herbs and half a tablespoon of the shiro miso paste or sea salt.

Using wet hands, roll a heaped teaspoon of risotto into a tight ball. Continue making

the balls until the risotto is used up. Place the balls onto a well-oiled baking tray as you go. Bake for about 15 minutes at 180°C (350°F)  until golden brown.

Variations

  • Once the rice is al dente, add a cup of good quality cheese like Parmesan.
  • Add a teaspoon of thyme leaves and two teaspoons of sea salt instead of miso.
  • Make seafood balls by using chopped green prawns and flathead fillets. Add them with the last ladle of stock.
  • Rather than making balls, serve as a risotto, adding more stock to make it wetter.
  • Add ½ cup of white wine just after you’ve added the rice and coated it in the oil.

 

Oysters With Asian Vinaigrette

½ CUP TAMARI

1 TSP SESAME OIL

1 TBSP BROWN RICE VINEGAR

1 TBSP GINGER, GRATED

12–16 OYSTERS ICE, CRUSHED

2 TBSP SPRING  ONIONS, JULIENNED

½ CUP CORIANDER LEAVES

 

Oysters with Asian vinaigrette[df, gf]

Oysters are exceptionally high in zinc, which aids the reproductive organs, skin and immune system. Eat lots of them if you are trying  to fall pregnant, have compromised  immunity, or low libido.

Mix together the tamari, oil, vinegar and ginger. Arrange the oysters on a platter atop the ice. Spoon one teaspoon of the

sauce into each oyster  and garnish with spring onions  and loads of fresh coriander.

Variations

  • These oysters are also good steamed in a bamboo basket over simmering water. Place some wax paper in the basket and carefully lay the oysters and their topping on the paper. Put the lid on and steam them for about one minute.
  • Add one teaspoon mirin to the dressing.
  • Try one teaspoon shao shing wine in the dressing.

 

Tahini Dressing and Hummus (JSNF)

MAKES 1 CUP

T AHI NI  DRE S S I NG  AND   HUMMUS

G F D F VG V S F N F G r F

Perhaps I should dedicate an entire book to my love of these two condiments. I get so excited experimenting with new combinations of flavours and, seriously, it never ends. Hummus is simply tahini dressing with chickpeas, and both are something you absolutely must know

how to make, and make you will – all the time. Heres my basic recipe followed by some of my favourite variations (page 162). I usually use my Vitamix which gives both tahini dressing and hummus an incredibly smooth and light texture, unless I’m only making a small amount, in which case I do it by hand. Of course use dried chickpeas, soak overnight and then boil until

soft if you prefer that to using tins. You’ll find the method for doing so on page 100.

4 tbsp hulled tahini juice of 1 lemon

1 garlic clove

½ tsp unrefined salt

2 tbsp water

1 × 400g (14 oz) BPA-free tin chickpeas, drained (for hummus only)

1  Put all the ingredients in your food processor or blender and blitz until smooth. Taste and adjust the flavours the way you like them. Use as much or as little lemon juice as you need to achieve the consistency you like..

Using unhulled tahini will keep the recipe raw and make the taste deeper/stronger.

* Add:

1 tsp apple cider vinegar, ½ tsp unrefined salt, 1 tsp dulse flakes, water to thin.

2 tbsp hemp seeds and ½ bunch of basil leaves.

2 boiled, peeled and chopped beetroot, ½ cup dill leaves and 1 tsp ground cumin.

1 cup steamed chopped pumpkin and 1 tsp ground cumin.

1 bunch of chopped coriander and 1 tbsp lime juice.

1 chopped kale leaf and 2 tsp grated fresh ginger.

2 tsp each ground fennel and cumin and 130 g

(4¾ oz/½ cup) plain yoghurt.

1 tsp smoked paprika and ½ cup roasted capsicum.

1 tbsp harissa paste.

1 tbsp za’atar, ½ cup roasted capsicum and 2 tsp preserved lemon.

1 tbsp grated fresh turmeric.

1 tbsp miso paste.

1 tsp tamari, 2 tsp syrup sweetener, 1 tbsp apple cider vinegar and 1½ tbsp mirin.

1 tbsp shiro miso paste, 1 tsp grated fresh ginger and ½ tsp tamari instead of the salt.

 

Nori rolls with Tempeh, Millet and Avocado (JWK)

MAKES 4 LONG ROLLS

1 cup millet

2½ cups filtered water

60 g tempeh, cut into 1-cm strips

⅓ cup tamari

1 tsp sesame oil

1 tbsp rice bran oil or olive oil

½ cup sesame seeds

4 nori sheets

1 Lebanese cucumber, julienned

1 carrot, julienned

1 avocado, sliced

2 spring onions, sliced in half

lengthways

Tahini  and Ginger Dressing

⅓ cup hulled or unhulled tahini

(stir the tahini before using it as

the oil separates)

1 tbsp grated fresh ginger

juice of 1 lemon or 1 tsp umeboshi

vinegar

water, to thin out

To Serve

⅓ cup tamari

½ tbsp wasabi paste

½ tsp sesame oil

To cook the millet, place the millet in a saucepan and wash well. Drain and add the water. Bring to the boil, then drop to a simmer. Put the lid half on the pan and gently cook over a medium heat until the water has almost evaporated. Taste the millet – it should be just tender. If not, add a little more water. Cover completely with the lid and remove from heat. Sit, covered, for

10–15 minutes to allow the millet to continue cooking in the steam.

Meanwhile, marinate the tempeh in the tamari and sesame oil for at least 10 minutes. Shake off any excess liquid, then cook the tempeh in batches in a large frying pan in the rice bran or olive oil, or brush with oil and grill, until golden on both sides. Cool slightly.

In a dry frying pan over medium heat, toast the sesame seeds until golden. Make sure you remove them from the pan before they burn. Cool slightly then mix through the millet.

For the tahini dressing, in a bowl, mix together the tahini, ginger and lemon juice or vinegar. Add enough water to make a thick paste, a bit like yoghurt. It will look like your mixture is curdling – keep whisking until smooth.

Mix the tahini dressing through the cooled millet. The mixture should not be too wet, so add a little bit of the tahini at a time until the consistency is right.

Lay out a nori sheet, shiny side down, on the benchtop. Place about ½ cup millet mixture on the nori and, with wet hands, press it down. Leave about a 2-cm space on the edge farthest away from you. Top with a single line of each of the tempeh, cucumber, carrot, avocado and spring onion. Roll up firmly, then cut into eight pieces, or in half. Repeat with the remaining nori sheets, millet mixture and vegetables.

Serve with a dipping sauce made up of tamari, wasabi and sesame oil.

 

P a r t y Food           131

White Bean and Pistachio Dip (JWK)

White Bean and

Pistachio Dip (DF, GF, V, VG)

The idea of this dip is to open your mind to other alternatives.

Try any bean, nut, herb or milk (just not cow’s milk).

MAKES ABOUT 1½ CUPS

400 g tin navy beans, rinsed and drained

½ cup raw unsalted pistachio nuts, roughly chopped

½ cup mint leaves

2 tsp lemon zest

⅓ cup soy milk

1 tsp sea salt

Purée all the ingredients together until smooth.

Serve with crackers, carrot sticks or as a spread on wraps. Store in an airtight container in the fridge for up to 1 week.

Main

Veggie Lasagna (EFTS)

Napoli sauce 

2–3 TBSP OLIVE OIL

1 ONION, DICED

2 GARLIC CLOVES, CRUSHED

2 X 400 G CANS CRUSHED TOMATOES

1 TBSP TOMATO PASTE

2 TSP SEA SALT

2 TSP CRACKED PEPPER

1 BAY LEAF

Ricotta sauce 

2 CUPS FRESH  RICOTTA

1 CUP SOY, RICE OR ALMOND MILK

1 CUP MACADAMIA PESTO (see page 151)

1 EGGPLANT, THINLY SLICED

2 CUPS JAP PUMPKIN, THINLY SLICED

4 ZUCCHINI, THINLY SLICED

½ CUP OLIVE OIL

2 TSP SEA SALT

CRACKED PEPPER

1 CUP MUSHROOMS,  SLICED

1 CUP EACH ITALIAN PARSLEY AND BASIL, ROUGHLY CHOPPED

1 CLOVE GARLIC PINCH  SEA SALT

1 TSP OLIVE OIL

1 PKT SPELT LASAGNE SHEETS

180 G (6 oz) BLOCK FIRM  TOFU (ORGANIC), THINLY SLICED

 

Lasagne [v]

Its difficult to dislike lasagne. The only real problem with it is that traditionally it contains wheat, dairy, yellow cheese and red meat, which is not necessarily good for you. After you try this recipe, you’ll be hooked—it’s a healthier version of a classic dish. I usually do a seafood version for Christmas Day lunch and often have my family wanting more and skipping the turkey.

SERVES 4-6

To make the Napoli, put the oil into a saucepan and heat. Then add the onion and garlic and cook gently for a minute or two.

Add the tomatoes, tomato paste, salt and pepper and bay leaf.

Cook for as long as you can but for at least 15 minutes and up to

30 minutes maximum.

To make the ricotta sauce, mix the ricotta and milk together. It should  look like a soft lumpy sauce. Add a little  water  if it’s too thick  so that  it is the consistency of cream.

 

Barramundi in a Banana Leaf, Thai style (EFTS)

1 BUNCH CORIANDER, ROUGHLY CHOPPED

1 CHILLI, CHOPPED

2 STALKS LEMONGRASS, WHITE  PART ONLY, FINELY CHOPPED

1 TBSP GINGER, GRATED

2 KAFFIR LIME LEAVES, SLICED

1 TSP SESAME OIL

1 TSP SEA SALT

1 × 2 KG (4 lb 4 oz) WHOLE BARRAMUNDI

1 LIME, SLICED

BANANA LEAVES, TO WRAP

½  CUP CORIANDER LEAVES

1 TBSP OLIVE OIL

 

Barramundi in a banana leaf, Thai  style [df, gf ]

Steaming is a healthy way to cook fish. It keeps all the juices in so none of the nutrients are lost and the fish stays moist and flavoursome. You can choose another fish if you can’t find barramundi but make sure that it’s a fairly fleshy fish like snapper, jewfish, salmon or tuna.

Pound  or blitz the coriander, chilli, lemongrass, ginger, lime leaves, sesame oil and salt into a paste. Rub the paste all over both sides of the fish. Lay half the lime slices on the banana leaf then place the fish on top. Drizzle with the olive oil. Place coriander leaves and the rest of the lime slices on top. It’s also nice to stuff the fish with the coriander

leaves and lime wedges if you have extra. Wrap the fish inside  the banana leaves and

secure with string. Depending on the size of your fish, you may use just one banana leaf or a few and overlap them.

Place the fish parcel  on the barbecue, or in the oven for 15 minutes at 180°C (350°F), and cook until fish is tender; about 7 minutes on each side if barbecuing. The fish is

cooked when it comes away from the bone easily when gently pulled apart with a knife. To serve, place the parcel  on a platter. Open up the parcel  to expose the fish and use the leaf as a base to keep the juices in while you serve the fish. Remember banana leaves are not edible.

 

Italian Mackerel in a Paper Bag with Freekeh (JWK)

Italian Mackerel in a

Paper Bag with Freekeh (DF)

Freekeh is a young wheat grain that has been smoked over barley.

It contains gluten but most people find it easier to digest than regular wheat grain. If you’d prefer to not eat any gluten, then use quinoa instead.

SERVES 4

1 cup cracked freekeh or quinoa, cooked until al dente

1 red Asian shallot, finely diced

1 lemon, thinly sliced

2 x 200 g wild mackerel fillets, cut

in half, skin off

2 tsp capers, rinsed and squeezed dry

2 tomatoes, diced

8 black olives, pitted and halved

1 handful of basil leaves

1 tbsp julienned preserved lemon

or grated zest of 1 lemon

1–2 garlic cloves, crushed

cracked white or black pepper

½ cup chargrilled capsicum, cut

into thin strips (optional)

2 tsp olive oil

Preheat the oven to 180°C. Prepare four pieces of baking paper about 30 cm square.

In a bowl, mix the freekeh with the shallot.

Lay the sheets of paper on a bench and place a few slices of lemon in the centre of each piece. Divide the freekeh mixture among the four sheets and top with the fish, capers, tomato, olives, basil, preserved lemon or lemon zest, garlic, pepper and capsicum (if using). Lastly, drizzle with a little olive oil.

Seal the ‘bag’ by folding in the sides and ends (fasten

with a metal paper clip if you need to). Place on a baking

tray and bake for 7 minutes (or cook on a hot barbecue).

Serve each closed bag in a shallow bowl.

Balinese Seafood Skewers (JWK)

Balinese Seafood Skewers (DF, GF)

These skewers mean Christmas to me, but any time in summer is a good enough reason to make them. The paste has a few ingredients, so if you’re short on time, buy a ready-made one – just make sure it contains nothing but natural ingredients.

SERVES 4

2½ tbsp sunflower oil or rice bran oil

6 green prawns, peeled and deveined

200 g boneless, firm white fish fillets

(such as flathead, redfish or wild

barramundi), skin off

1 cup grated or flaked coconut

4 long bamboo skewers, soaked in

water for 5 minutes, or

3 lemongrass stems

1 short cucumber, cut into large dice

1 red Asian shallot, thinly sliced

½ cup roughly chopped coriander

1 tsp sea salt

1 tbsp lime juice

Spice Paste

6 French shallots, peeled and roughly

chopped

4 garlic cloves, roughly chopped

3 long red chillies, deseeded and

chopped

2 bird’s eye chillies, deseeded and

chopped

2-cm piece of galangal, peeled and

sliced

1 lemongrass stem, white part only,

roughly chopped

1 tbsp grated fresh turmeric

1 tbsp coriander leaves and stems,

roughly chopped

½ tsp cracked black peppercorns

½ tsp freshly grated nutmeg

1 tbsp lime zest

1 tsp sea salt, or to taste

For the spice paste, in a blender or mortar and pestle,

blitz or pound together all the ingredients. You may need

to use a little water to bring it together.

Heat ½ tablespoon of the oil in a frying pan over low heat, add the spice paste and gently fry until fragrant, about 1 minute. Cool slightly.

Meanwhile, place the seafood in a processor (or use a stick blender) along with the coconut and fried spice paste and blitz until minced.

Mould about 2 tablespoons of the seafood mixture around the skewers or lemongrass stems. Chill for

30–60 minutes, so the skewers hold together when you’re cooking them.

Grill, barbecue or pan-fry the skewers in the remaining oil until golden on all sides.

Make a salad by tossing together the cucumber, shallot, coriander, salt and lime juice in a bowl.

Serve the salad on the side of the skewers.

Seafood  75

 

Millet Burgers with Miso and Pumpkin Sauce (JWK)

Millet Burgers with Miso and

Pumpkin Sauce (DF, V, VG)

This sauce is so good, you’ll want to use it on other things aside from these very yummy vegan burgers. It is a good idea to start this recipe a day ahead.

SERVES 2

½ cup millet

1½ cups filtered water

½ cup grated Japanese pumpkin

½ onion, brown or white, diced

1 tbsp finely snipped chives

tamari, to taste

1 tbsp brown rice flour, if needed

¼ cup sesame seeds

1 tbsp olive oil or rice bran oil

Sauce

1 tbsp shiro miso

1 tbsp hulled tahini (stir the tahini

before using it as the oil separates)

½ cup chopped Japanese pumpkin,

steamed

1 tbsp sake or mirin (optional)

1 tbsp grated fresh ginger

sea salt, to taste

To Serve

4 spelt sourdough buns

4 iceberg lettuce leaves

To cook the millet, place it in a saucepan and wash well. Drain and add the water. Bring to the boil, then drop to a simmer. Put the lid half on the pan and gently cook over a medium heat until the water has almost evaporated. Taste the millet – it should be just tender.

If not, add a little more water. Cover completely with

the lid and remove from heat. Let sit, covered, for 10–15

minutes to allow the millet to continue cooking in the steam.

Allow the millet to cool a little, then add to a bowl with the pumpkin, onion, chives and tamari. Mix well. You may need to add the brown rice flour if the mixture is too wet. Cover with a plate or lid and leave in the fridge overnight to firm up. (If you don’t have time for this step, you will need to mix in a couple of eggs.)

Shape the millet mixture into patties (the number and size depends on the size of your buns), then roll in the sesame seeds.

To make the sauce, mash the miso, tahini, pumpkin, sake or mirin and ginger, or purée them using a hand- held blender. Taste for seasoning.

Heat the oil in a hot cast-iron or non-stick pan then cook the patties for about 1 minute on each side, until golden.

To serve, spread the inside of each bun with about

1 tablespoon of the sauce, then top with a patty. Finish

with a lettuce leaf and close up.

 

Salads

Watermelon, Feta and Watercress Salad (EFTS)

6 CUPS WATERMELON, CUT INTO BIG CHUNKS

2 CUPS GOAT’S FETA, CUT INTO 3- CM CUBES

4 TBSP OLIVE OIL

2 TBSP GOOD BALSAMIC VINEGAR SEA SALT AND CRACKED PEPPER

TWO HANDFULS WATERCRESS

Watermelon, feta and watercress salad [ gf, v]

Watermelon is a cooling food and perfect for the warmer weather. Its flavour is sweet and its colour screams the season. I know this combination  of watermelon and feta may sound odd but I guarantee, once tasted, you’ll make it often.

SERVES 4

This salad is ‘layered’. Place a few chunks of watermelon on

each of your serving  plates,  and top with some feta. Combine  the oil, vinegar and seasoning and drizzle some of the mixture over

each of the watermelon and feta mounds. Top the salads with a generous handful of watercress, and then finish with a little more of the oil, and vinegar and pepper.

Variations

  • Use marinated feta instead—there are some wonderful combinations out there.
  • Add torn mint leaves with or without the watercress.
  • Add blood orange segments with the watermelon—it adds a whole other dimension.

 

Broad Bean and Freekeh Salad (EFTS)

 

2 CUPS FRESH  BROAD BEANS

2 CUPS FREEKAH, COOKED

1 SMALL RED ONION, FINELY SLICED

1 GARLIC CLOVE, CRUSHED

2 TOMATOES, DICED

1 LEBANESE CUCUMBER, DICED

1 CUP EACH MINT  AND PARSLEY LEAVES, ROUGHLY CHOPPED

3 TBSP EXTRA VIRGIN OLIVE OIL

1 LEMON, ZEST ONLY

1 TSP UMEBOSHI  VINEGAR OR LEMON JUICE

2 TSP SEA SALT

 

Broad  bean  and freekah salad [df, vg, v]

Freekah is a type of wheat grain that  is picked young and then smoked over barley. It is packed with nutrients and is very easy to digest, unlike our modern wheat grain. It has a chewy texture and a nutty flavour and is available either whole or cracked.

SERVES 2

To cook the broad beans, steam them in a little  water  for about one minute, until just tender. Drain, then cool them enough to handle.  Then take off their inner skins.

In a large bowl, toss together all of the ingredients. Taste  for seasoning and adjust if necessary.

6 CUPS WATERMELON, CUT INTO BIG CHUNKS

2 CUPS GOAT’S FETA, CUT INTO 3- CM CUBES

4 TBSP OLIVE OIL

2 TBSP GOOD BALSAMIC VINEGAR SEA SALT AND CRACKED PEPPER

TWO HANDFULS WATERCRESS

Watermelon, feta and watercress salad [ gf, v]

Watermelon is a cooling food and perfect for the warmer weather. Its flavour is sweet and its colour screams the season. I know this combination  of watermelon and feta may sound odd but I guarantee, once tasted, you’ll make it often.

This salad is ‘layered’. Place a few chunks of watermelon on

each of your serving  plates,  and top with some feta. Combine  the oil, vinegar and seasoning and drizzle some of the mixture over

each of the watermelon and feta mounds. Top the salads with a generous handful of watercress, and then finish with a little more of the oil, and vinegar and pepper.

  • Use marinated feta instead—there are some wonderful combinations out there.
  • Add torn mint leaves with or without the watercress.
  • Add blood orange segments with the watermelon—it adds a whole other dimension.

Kerabu (JSNF)

 

Kerabu (DF, GF)

 

Kerabu is a refreshing Malaysian side dish that goes well with dark, highly spiced dishes such as curries. Scald the bean sprouts, if you wish, by running boiling water through them in a sieve. Quickly follow with cold water to keep them crisp. Leave the dried shrimp and fish sauce out if you’d like this dish vego or vegan.

SERVES 4

1 cup desiccated coconut

2 tbsp dried shrimp

1 cup trimmed bean sprouts

1 cup thinly sliced cucumber

1 handful of green beans, sliced on

the diagonal

1 handful of snow peas, sliced on

the diagonal

1 cup thinly sliced wombok

(Chinese cabbage)

1 cup julienned carrot

4 spring onions, thinly sliced

1 handful of Vietnamese mint, thinly

sliced

6 long red chillies, thinly sliced

(less if you like)

2 tbsp lime juice (more if you like)

1 tbsp fish sauce, or to taste

1 tsp grated coconut palm sugar

or panela, or to taste

Dry-roast the coconut in a heavy-based frying pan

until light brown and aromatic, then either pound it in

a mortar and pestle or blitz in a food processor until it

resembles breadcrumbs. (Alternatively, you can use

fresh coconut, and omit the roasting.)

Rinse the dried shrimp, drain, dry with paper towel and grind coarsely, either in a mortar and pestle or a food processor.

In a large bowl, combine the coconut, shrimp, vegetables, mint and chilli.

In a small bowl, mix the lime juice, fish sauce and palm sugar or panela to taste, then toss with the salad.

Buckwheat, Smoked Tofu, Daikon and Arame Salad (EFTS)

1 PKT BUCKWHEAT NOODLES

2 TBSP ARAME, SOAKED IN ½ CUP WATER UNTIL SOFT

1 CUP DAIKON, CUT INTO MATCHSTICKS

1 CARROT, CUT INTO MATCHSTICKS

1 CUP SMOKED TOFU, CUT INTO MATCHSTICKS

½ CUP TAMARI

2 TBSP WHITE  WINE  VINEGAR

2 TBSP MIRIN

1½ TBSP SESAME OIL

1/ 3  CUP SESAME SEEDS, GROUND

1 CUP BABY DAIKON SPROUTS, OR ANY OTHER SPROUTS

1 SHEET  TOASTED NORI, SHREDDED

 

Buckwheat, smoked tofu,daikon and arame salad [df, gf, vg, v]

This delicious salad contains two kinds of sea vegetable: arame and nori. Arame is high in calcium and iodine and nori has a high-protein content and is easily digested. I love cooking with sea vegetables because they’re so tasty and convenient to use. In this recipe I’ve included buckwheat noodles as they’re gluten-free. Buckwheat can also improve circulation  and strengthen digestion.

SERVES 4

Cook the noodles  according to the instructions on the packet.

Drain and set aside to dry out a little. Drain the arame  and keep the liquid.

Put the daikon, carrot, tofu, noodles  and arame  in a bowl and

gently mix together. For the sauce, mix the soaking liquid from the arame  together with the Tamari, vinegar, mirin,  sesame oil and sesame seeds. Drizzle over the noodles  and top with the

sprouts and nori.

 

Kumera Salad (EFTS)

4 CUPS KUMERA

1 TBSP OLIVE OIL

2 TSP CHILLI POWDER

1 TBSP ASAFOETIDA

1 TBSP GARAM MASALA

1 TBSP LEMON OR LIME JUICE

1 CUP COCONUT FLAKES

1 BUNCH CORIANDER LEAVES, ROUGHLY CHOPPED

1/ 3  CUP TOASTED SESAME SEEDS

½ CUP ORGANIC DRY ROASTED PEANUTS

 

Kumera salad [df, gf, vg, v]

Everyone loves this salad—not only because of the wonderful  flavours, but because it’s so simple to make. The sesame seeds are a good source of calcium, fibre and essential fatty acids, and toasting them really brings out their nutty flavour. You may not have used asafoetida before but do try it. It’s a great herb that very handily replaces garlic and onions. Beware, it tastes better than it smells in the bottle.

SERVES 4

Chop kumera into large, even chunks and steam until tender but not mushy. Heat the oil in a pan and add the spices, frying until

fragrant. Pour the oil over the warm kumera. Let cool then add

the citrus juice. Next, toss through the coconut flakes, coriander leaves, sesame seeds and peanuts.

 

Roasted Vegetable and Grain Salad (EFTS)

1 DESIREE  POTATO, SCRUBBED, CUT INTO WEDGES

1 RED ONION, PEELED  AND QUARTERED

1 CUP SWEET  POTATO, CUT INTO ROUGH CHUNKS

1 BULB FENNEL, QUARTERED

4 BABY BEETROOT,  SCRUBBED CLEAN

1 ZUCCHINI, CHOPPED  INTO

2- CM CHUNKS

1 CUP BUTTON MUSHROOMS

1 CORN COB, CUT INTO 4 PIECES

4 CLOVES GARLIC

FRESH  ROSEMARY (optional) EXTRA VIRGIN OLIVE OIL

SEA SALT AND PEPPER

½ CUP QUINOA

1 CUP WATER

2 TBSP TOASTED NUTS LIKE PINE, ALMONDS, WALNUTS

1 CUP HERBS LIKE PARSLEY, MINT,  BASIL, CORIANDER, ROUGHLY CHOPPED

HANDFUL ROCKET OR BABY SPINACH

1 TBSP LEMON OR LIME ZEST

1 TBSP LEMON OR LIME JUICE

 

Roasted vegetable and grain salad [df, gf, vg, v]

A gorgeous way to get all the goodies you need in one dish. If you suffer from arthritis or diabetes it’s better to leave the potato out as it’s part of the nightshade  family,  which some people find gives them an inflammatory reaction.

SERVES 2

Combine  vegies, garlic, rosemary and oil in a baking pan, season  and mix well. Roast, turning once, at 200°C (400°F). After 10 minutes, remove the mushrooms, zucchini

and corn as they don’t take as long to cook. Continue cooking the rest of the vegies for another 20 to 30 minutes, until they are tender.

Meanwhile, wash the quinoa well and place in a saucepan with the water.  Bring to the boil then lower the heat for about 5 minutes, until most of the water  is absorbed. Put a lid on and turn the heat off. Let sit for at least another 5 minutes before taking the lid

off (see ‘How to cook grains’ on page 3).

Combine  the vegies, quinoa, nuts, herbs,  rocket and zest. Squeeze over the juice and check seasoning to taste.

Variations

  • Stir through a cup of flaked smoked trout.
  • Use barley or organic brown rice instead of quinoa.
  • Add a can of cannellini or navy beans or chickpeas to the salad when you mix it all together.
  • Serve with Tahini Dressing (see page 149).
  • Add a splash of umeboshi vinegar to finish

Veggies

Spring Carrots (EFTS)

1 BUNCH DUTCH CARROTS

2 TBSP HONEY, AGAVE, MAPLE OR RICE SYRUP

½ CUP WATER

1 TBSP ARAME

 

Spring carrots [df, gf, vg, v]

Now is the time for complex sweeteners such as rice syrup, agave, honey and maple syrup. Agave syrup, made from the agave plant, is the one you might be least familiar  with. After you’ve  used any  of these sweeteners, you’ll  understand how much  better they taste than processed sugar. They are a great way to dress up your carrots.

SERVES 4

If the carrots are small, leave them whole, otherwise cut on the diagonal into one-centimetre pieces. Place in a saucepan with water,  syrup and arame. Let the carrots steam until they are

just tender. Remove and place on a serving  plate. Let the liquid

continue to simmer for another minute to reduce then pour over the carrots.

 

Baked Maple Pumpkin (EFTS)

½ JAPANESE PUMPKIN, SKIN LEFT ON, CUT INTO WEDGES

1 CUP MAPLE SYRUP

½ CUP PEPITAS

 

Baked maple pumpkin [df, gf, vg, v]

This is a good way to get the kids to eat pumpkin.  Adults, however, will need no convincing. This dish is very high in zinc, which is an essential mineral for skin, nails, hair, immune and reproductive  systems and your digestion. Pepitas are the inside part of the pumpkin seed and will add a lovely crunch to every bite.

Place the pumpkin on a baking tray and coat with the syrup. Bake in a moderate oven for about 15 minutes, then sprinkle over the pepitas. Bake for another 5 minutes or until golden brown.

 

Mediterranean Stuffed Veggies (JWK)

Mediterranean Stuffed Veggies

(DF, GF, V, VG)

Add some mashed firm tofu or legumes to this dish to add more protein, or serve these veggies as a side with some marinated tofu or fish.

SERVES 4

½ cup millet

1½ cups filtered water

1 garlic clove, finely grated

2 tbsp olive oil

1 eggplant, halved, flesh partly

scooped out and chopped

2 large zucchini, halved, flesh partly

scooped out and chopped

½ cup mixed herbs (such as oregano,

flat-leaf parsley, thyme and/or

basil), chopped

¼ cup pitted olives, any type,

roughly chopped

1 tbsp capers, rinsed and squeezed

dry

zest of 1 lemon

1 red capsicum, halved and deseeded

2 large tomatoes, halved and deseeded

Preheat the oven to 180°C.

Place the millet in a saucepan and wash well. Drain and add the water. Bring to the boil, then drop to a simmer. Put the lid half on and gently cook over a medium heat until the water has almost evaporated. Taste the millet

– it should be just tender. If not, add a little more water. Completely cover with the lid and remove from heat.

Let sit, covered, for 10–15 minutes to allow the millet to continue cooking in the steam.

In a large frying pan, lightly sauté the garlic in

1 tablespoon of the oil for about 10 seconds over low

to medium heat. Stir in the chopped flesh from the

eggplant and zucchini and cook for 5 minutes, or until

the veggies have softened a little. Allow the mixture to

cool, then add the millet, herbs, olives, capers and lemon

zest. Stuff this mixture into the capsicum and tomato

halves, place on a baking tray and drizzle with the

remaining oil. Bake for about 20 minutes, or until the veggies are soft.

Potato Salad with Broccoli and Mint Pesto ((JSNF)

SERvES 4 – 6

P O T A T O   S A L A D   W I T H

BR O C C OL I  AND  MI N T   P E S T O

G F D F V S F G r F

A lovely twist on an old favourite, and talk about yummy. Its great for a picnic or spring lunch. If you can’t find fresh broad beans in season, using frozen broad beans is fine, but avoid those from China as they will usually contain too many heavy metals. The New Zealand ones are

nice. Pour boiling water over them, remove the loose outer skin, then refresh in cold water.

1 tsp apple cider vinegar

cup Broccoli and mint pesto

(page 55)

1 kg (2 lb 4 oz) new potatoes, washed

175 g (6 oz/1 cup) fresh broad beans, steamed and peeled

2 soft-boiled eggs, halved (optional)

80 g (2¾ oz/½ cup) roughly chopped toasted almonds

1 tbsp mint, roughly chopped, plus mint leaves for garnish

1  Add the vinegar to the pesto. Set aside.

2  Boil the potatoes until soft but not squashy, then drain into a colander and shake off any excess water. Tip into a bowl and, while still hot, pour on the pesto dressing, reserving

1 tablespoon. Mix gently, crushing the spuds a little as you mix, then add the broad beans and gently toss. Carefully spoon

onto a platter then garnish with the eggs, almonds and mint, then drizzle with the rest of the pesto and serve.

V A R IA T IO NS

* Any vinegar or nut will work nicely.

* For a different taste sensation, use Green sauce (page 169)

instead of the pesto.

 

Balinese Coconut and Cabbage Salad (JSNF) 

Sweet Things

Sago Fruit Cups  (EFTS)

¼ CUP SAGO

1 CUP WATER

¾–1 CUP ALMOND OR COCONUT MILK

1/ 3  CUP SWEETENER, LIKE GRATED COCONUT PALM SUGAR, AGAVE OR MAPLE SYRUP (optional)

2 TBSP DESICCATED  OR SHREDDED COCONUT (optional)

Topping

THREE  FRUITS;  FOR EXAMPLE THE FLESH  FROM TWO MANGO CHEEKS, A CUP OF ANY BERRIES, OR ½ CUP PASSIONFRUIT PULP

1 CUP SUGAR-FREE  FRUIT  JUICE,  LIKE PEAR, APPLE, STRAWBERRY

3 TSP AGAR AGAR FLAKES

 

Sago  fruit cups [df, gf, vg, v]

Sago has a lovely texture and lends itself well to desserts. You can leave out the agar agar and simply serve this in a bowl with fruit and a sweetener.

MAKES 4 DESSERT  CUPS

In a non-stick pot, cook the sago in the water  until soft. This will take around

30 minutes. Drain and place in a bowl, then stir through the milk. Now stir in the sweetener (if using) and allow the mixture to cool.

Spoon the sago into glasses, filling halfway. Top with a layer of coconut (if using) and put the glasses on a tray in the fridge to allow them to cool slightly while you prepare the fruit topping.

Prepare one fruit at a time. Place it in a processor and blend with enough juice to make

a puree. Sieve to remove any air bubbles then put this mixture into a shallow  pan with a teaspoon of agar agar. Bring to a simmer, then simmer until the agar agar dissolves and

thickens, about ten minutes. Let the mixture cool slightly.

Top the sago cups with the fruit puree  and put the cups back in the fridge to cool and set before serving.

Variations

  • Add a tablespoon of granola or toasted muesli between the layers for a bit of crunch.
  • Drizzle a teaspoon of hulled tahini between the layers, with or without the granola.

 

Chocolate Almond Mousse (EFTS)

1/ 3  CUP RICE FLOUR

1½ CUPS ALMOND MILK

1 VANILLA POD, SPLIT AND SCRAPED

1 CUP WATER

¾ TSP AGAR AGAR FLAKES

3 TBSP DUTCH COCOA POWDER

1/ 3  CUP CAROB MOLASSES

2 TSP ORANGE ZEST OR ½  TSP ORANGE FLOWER WATER

COCOA POWDER, TO SERVE

 

Chocolate almond mousse [df, gf, vg, v]

For chocolate lovers on a gluten-, dairy-  and wheat-free diet, this mousse is a dream come true. I find that orange and chocolate make wonderful partners but you could leave the orange out if you don’t agree. Buy the best quality cocoa you can find as it will make a real difference to the final taste. Agar agar is used instead of gelatin to set the dessert.

SERVES 4

Sift the flour into a pan and whisk in the almond  milk. Add the seeds from the vanilla pod and bring to a simmer. Cook

for about 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. It should start to

glisten. Meanwhile, place the water  and the agar agar in another pan, and simmer until the agar agar has dissolved, about two

minutes. Add this to the flour and milk and stir well.

In a bowl combine the cocoa, molasses and orange zest to form a smooth paste. Pour into the flour and milk mixture in the pan and whisk well over a low heat to dissolve. Cool slightly, then

pour into little  bowls or pretty glasses and put in the fridge.

They’re ready to serve when the mousse  is completely chilled. Serve with a sprinkling of cocoa powder.

 

Caramelised Figs (EFTS)

 

4 BIG, JUICY, RIPE FIGS

1–2 TBSP BROWN SUGAR

1 CUP THICK, NATURAL YOGHURT

1 TBSP LEMON OR LIME ZEST

Caramelised figs  [df, gf, v]

Figs are reputed to be an aphrodisiac and once you catch the scent of them coming off the grill, you’ll be pretty  happy you’re about to eat them! With  plump, juicy and delicious figs, there is something  particularly luxurious  about this  dessert—even more so with  a little Grand Marnier drizzled over the figs while still warm from the grill.

SERVES 4

Slice the figs in half then press  them into the brown  sugar. Place them face down

straight onto a hot barbecue or chargrill and brown. Serve with a good dollop of yoghurt mixed with lemon zest.

Variations

  • Drizzle some Grand Marnier over the figs as they come off the hotplate.
  • Garnish with slithered almonds and berries.

 

Baked Pears with Ginger and Fruit Compote (EFTS)

4 BOSC, D’ANJOU OR OTHER PEARS

1 CUP DARK GRAPE JUICE

1 CUP SUGAR-FREE  APPLE JUICE

1 TBSP GINGER, GRATED

1 CINNAMON  STICK

1 TSP GROUND ALLSPICE

4 TBSP FRUIT  COMPOTE (see page 219)

BUSH HONEY YOGHURT, TO SERVE

2 TBSP MINT,  SHREDDED TO GARNISH

 

Baked pears with ginger and fruit compote [gf, v]

Preserved ginger is perfect to eat in winter as it will improve your circulation  and digestion. Any kind of pear will be lovely—check what’s in season in your area.

SERVES 4

Core the pears and peel just the lower half. In a baking dish combine the grape and apple juices, ginger, cinnamon and

allspice.  Place the pears in the pan with the liquid. Cover and bake for 25 minutes at 180°C (350°F)  or until tender.

Remove from the oven and pour the liquid into a small saucepan. Simmer this syrup for about 10 minutes or until it has reduced

and thickened. Meanwhile, fill the holes in each pear with a

little  Fruit Compote then place on individual serving  plates or a large serving  platter. Pour the hot liquid over and around the pears. Garnish with mint and serve with yoghurt.

Variations

  • For an even lighter pear, omit the juices and simply steam the pears in a little water.
  • Try mixing half a cup of almond butter to the Fruit Compote.

Pistachio and Rosewater Halva (JWK)

Pistachio and Rosewater

Halva (DF, GF, V, VG)

I love halva, but I never buy it because of the tons of white sugar in it.

Voilà! A healthy halva.

MAKES 10 SLICES

1 cup sesame seeds, toasted

2 tbsp pistachio nuts

1 tsp rosewater

2 tbsp raisins

2 tbsp agave or rice syrup

In a spice grinder or mortar and pestle, pound the sesame seeds to a fine powder.

Transfer the ground sesame seeds to a food processor, add the rest of the ingredients and process until you get a stiff batter. Spoon the mixture onto a piece of baking paper about 30 cm long and shape into a log.

Roll the paper tightly around the log, twisting the ends. Refrigerate for at least an hour before eating.

Serve in the paper, opened up and cut into 2-cm rounds.

 

Fig, Coconut and Cacao Truffles (JWK)

Fig, Coconut and

Cacao Truffles (DF, GF, R, V, VG)

I love making little balls of goodness like these. You can use whatever

dried fruit and nuts you have in the cupboard, and experiment with different spices.

Sometimes I add seeds, LSA, spirulina or barley grass powder.

MAKES ABOUT 20

1 cup roughly chopped dried figs

1 cup pitted and roughly chopped

dates

1 cup desiccated coconut, plus extra

for dusting

½ cup walnuts, chopped

½ cup raw cacao powder

½ tsp ground cardamom

1 tsp lemon zest

½–¾ cup coconut oil

2 tbsp each extra raw cacao powder

or ground walnuts, for dusting

Place the dried fruit in the food processor and process to a chunky paste. Add the rest of the ingredients, leaving the oil until last. Blitz until smooth and glossy.

Roll the mixture into balls the size of a walnut, then dust in the extra cacao powder or ground walnuts.

These will keep for months stored in an airtight container in the pantry. Chill if you like a firmer treat.[/private]

 

 

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