Sea vegetables – used to treat thyroid imbalances

sea veg

Sea vegetables are used to treat thyroid imbalances, due to their exceptional content of iodine. They promote hair growth and prevents its loss; are a very high source of calcium and iron, therefore helpful for teeth, bones and anaemia. They promote a beautiful, glowing, wrinkle free skin.

Look for arame, dulse, wakame, nori and agar. Kombu and hijiki are no longer available in Oz, unfortunately. Source product from the (relatively) clean waters of New Zealand, Tasmania and Alaska – staying as far away from the Fukoshima disaster in Japan. The waters are likely contaminated with radioactive waste.

They have around 100-500 times the amount of iodine than shellfish (depending on where it is harvested) and contains more than 10 times the amount of calcium than cow’s milk. Its protein is easy to digest.

They are great pickled, or add 1 tbsp to the pot whenever you’re cooking quinoa or brown rice, steamed veggies, soups, stir fry, stews – anything with water. Or put it in the colander and drain your hot noodles or pasta over the top of it – this will easily hydrate it.

The taste is mild and you’re getting a bit hit of minerals including iodine, omega 3 and other nutrients in there with just a few strands. Oh, and they help to rid our body of heavy metals. Nice huh?

are used to treat thyroid imbalances, due to their exceptional content of iodine. They promote hair growth and prevents its loss; are a very high source of calcium and iron, therefore helpful for teeth, bones and anaemia. They promote a beautiful, glowing, wrinkle free skin.

Look for arame, dulse, wakame, nori and agar. Kombu and hijiki are no longer available in Oz, unfortunately. Source product from the (relatively) clean waters of New Zealand, Tasmania and Alaska – staying as far away from the Fukoshima disaster in Japan. The waters are likely contaminated with radioactive waste.

They have around 100-500 times the amount of iodine than shellfish (depending on where it is harvested) and contains more than 10 times the amount of calcium than cow’s milk. Its protein is easy to digest.

They are great pickled, or add 1 tbsp to the pot whenever you’re cooking quinoa or brown rice, steamed veggies, soups, stir fry, stews – anything with water. Or put it in the colander and drain your hot noodles or pasta over the top of it – this will easily hydrate it.

The taste is mild and you’re getting a bit hit of minerals including iodine, omega 3 and other nutrients in there with just a few strands. Oh, and they help to rid our body of heavy metals. Nice huh?

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